How Latin America and the Caribbean countries could shape the multilateral system in the next two years

June 7, 2024

As we stand at a critical moment for global governance, with unprecedented challenges and opportunities on the horizon, this policy brief analyzes the leadership roles of countries from Latin America and the Caribbean in the next two years (2024-2025).

The document focuses on the regionʼs opportunities to make an ambitious and sustained contribution to framing multilateral processes and helping renew multilateral cooperation regionally and globally. It concludes by providing actionable suggestions for unlocking the regionʼs full potential as a proactive and influential force in shaping the future of multilateralism.

Principales hallazgos

It is equally important to remain realistic about the challenging geopolitical context and to be clear that it will be impossible - in the near future - to find common regional positions and actionable demands to gain more influence during the ongoing negotiations to reform multilateralism.

Countries like Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, and Mexico must demonstrate pragmatic, proactive, and robust leadership. They hold key positions at the negotiating table and should, therefore, assume a central role in shaping global climate action and governance reform.

The region could cultivate partnerships worldwide during the next months to obtain tangible advantages rather than alliances. The countries should concentrate their efforts on like-minded issues with common positions to advance actionable demands shared by African and Asian countries, but also European countries.

Main Findings

It is equally important to remain realistic about the challenging geopolitical context and to be clear that it will be impossible - in the near future - to find common regional positions and actionable demands to gain more influence during the ongoing negotiations to reform multilateralism.

Countries like Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, and Mexico must demonstrate pragmatic, proactive, and robust leadership. They hold key positions at the negotiating table and should, therefore, assume a central role in shaping global climate action and governance reform.

The region could cultivate partnerships worldwide during the next months to obtain tangible advantages rather than alliances. The countries should concentrate their efforts on like-minded issues with common positions to advance actionable demands shared by African and Asian countries, but also European countries.

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